Why does eastern Europe have less Islamic terror attacks?

 

This is a very interesting question and one poised in my own mind a lot.  Why do Eastern European countries have less, significantly less, Islamic terrorist attacks?  Many would say that it is because they have significantly less Muslim’s living in their countries.  What the Poles have realised is that there is a correlation between the number of Muslims in a country and the number of terror attacks a country has to suffer.

Sound racist?  Maybe just stating the obvious?  Douglas Murray raises this very question:

Of course, any connection between the mass influx of people into Europe and the terrorism and other societal problems to which the continent is waking up every day is still frowned upon.

Indeed, there is no faster way to be thrown out of what remains of polite society than suggesting that the immigration and the terrorism may be linked. Yet the link is obvious. For sure there are those who over-egg the point. The Stockholm attacker from April was a recent arrival in that country. As were the axe-wielding train ­attacker last northern summer in Wurzburg, Germany, and the suicide bomber in Ansbach, Germany, that same month.

But then the Paris attackers from November 2015 included people born and brought up in France and Belgium.

So while some of the terrorists may have just arrived, others were born in Europe.

This fact is not quite as soothing as the proponents of weak borders and mass immigration would like it to be. For if Europe is doing such a bad job of integrating people who are already here, then who but a madman would seek to propel immigration from Muslim countries to such a historic high? The question goes unanswered because in Europe’s immigration debate it is still very rarely asked.

Murray makes the point that if we wish less Islamic terrorism we should have less Islam.  Is this not the conclusion the Eastern Europeans have come to?

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Rambler
Lived and worked in Muslim-majority countries for over 12 years while working in the international development sector as a senior director/manager. This included South East Asia, East, and West Africa (including the Horn of Africa), the Middle East and Afghanistan. Main interests in life is the study of Political Islam and how this has interacted with non-Islamic civilisations, especially Judeo-Christian civilisations, in history and currently.

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